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  • Restoring volume, diversity and continuity of deadwood in boreal forests.

    Author(s) : Hekkala, A. M.Ahtikoski, A.Päätalo, M. L.Tarvainen, O.Siipilehto, J.Tolvanen, A.

    Author Affiliation : Thule Institute, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 7300, 90014 Oulu, Finland.

    Author Email : anne.maarit.hekkala@slu.se

    Journal article : Biodiversity and Conservation 2016 Vol.25 No.6 pp.1107-1132 ref.84

    Abstract : Restoration of boreal forestsboreal forestsSubject Category: Vegetation Types
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    by emulating natural disturbances is used to bring back typical components of natural forests that are reduced by silvicultural management. The volume, diversity and continuity of deadwood are the most important factors determining the diversity of deadwood-dependent species. In a large-scale experiment consisting of 43 experimental stands and 15 controls we assessed how alternative restoration methods enhancing deadwood availability (fellingfellingSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    and felling+burningburningSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    with two levels of felling: 20 and 40% of initial volume of living treestreesSubject Category: Organism Groups
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    , and a storm treatment) would affect short- and long-term deadwood volume and diversity using 7-year deadwood measurements and simulation modelling. In short-term, restoration by felling+burning increased both the volume and diversity of deadwood, whereas felling only increased merely the volume of deadwood. The simulations of tree growthgrowthSubject Category: Natural Processes
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    , mortalitymortalitySubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    and wood decompositiondecompositionSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    indicated that in comparison to controls, felled and storm-treated stands have greater deadwood volumes up to 40 years and felled+burned stands more than 60 years after restoration. Our results suggest that felling with 20% of initial tree volume does not harm the future deadwood continuity, whereas intensive burning may imperil the deadwood continuity in a stand level. In conclusion, restoration clearly speeds up the development of the deadwood volumes needed to host large portions of biodiversitybiodiversitySubject Category: Properties
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    , and burning is the most effective restoration method in short- and long term. In practice, several restoration methods could be used concurrently in the landscapelandscapeSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    to obtain the best results.

    ISSN : 0960-3115

    DOI : 10.1007/s10531-016-1112-z

    Record Number : 20163174465

    Publisher : Springer

    Location of publication : Amsterdam

    Country of publication : Netherlands

    Language of text : English

    Indexing terms for this abstract:

    Organism descriptor(s) : plantsplantsSubject Category: Organism Names
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    Descriptor(s) : biodiversitybiodiversitySubject Category: Properties
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    , boreal forestsboreal forestsSubject Category: Vegetation Types
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    , burningburningSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , decompositiondecompositionSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , fellingfellingSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , forestsforestsSubject Category: Habitats
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    , growthgrowthSubject Category: Natural Processes
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    , landscapelandscapeSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , measurementmeasurementSubject Category: Techniques, Methodologies and Equipment
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    , modelsmodelsSubject Category: Techniques, Methodologies and Equipment
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    , mortalitymortalitySubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , silviculturesilvicultureSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , treestreesSubject Category: Organism Groups
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    , woody plantswoody plantsSubject Category: Organism Groups
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    Identifier(s) : death rate, flaming, metrology

    Broader term(s) : eukaryoteseukaryotesSubject Category: Organism Names
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