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  • Adsorption capacity of wildfire-produced charcoal from Pacific Northwest forests.

    Author(s) : Pingree, M. R. A.DeLuca, E. E.Schwartz, D. T.DeLuca, T. H.

    Author Affiliation : School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, 102 Anderson Hall, Box 352100, Seattle, WA 98195-2100, USA.

    Author Email : mpingree@uw.edu

    Journal article : Geoderma 2016 Vol.283 pp.68-77

    Abstract : This researchresearchSubject Category: Disciplines, Occupations and Industries
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    evaluated the adsorptionadsorptionSubject Category: Natural Processes
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    capacitycapacitySubject Category: Properties
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    of charcoalcharcoalSubject Category: Commodities and Products
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    charcoalSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    collected from O-horizon soils of mixed-severity firefireSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    regime forestsforestsSubject Category: Vegetation Types
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    forestsSubject Category: Habitats
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    in the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA. This property is important to consider in the context of post-fire soil carbon (C) recovery and nutrient cyclingcyclingSubject Category: Natural Processes
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    as charcoal has a high affinity for dissolved organic C compounds released by throughfallthroughfallSubject Category: Climate Related
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    and organic matterorganic matterSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    decompositiondecompositionSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    . Charcoal samples produced in the laboratory at 300°C, 500°C, and 800°C provided a baseline for chemical compositionchemical compositionSubject Category: Properties
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    and adsorption capacity using phenolphenolSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    as the sorbate. These samples were used to compare charcoal collected at wildfire chronosequence sites (3-115 years) where formationformationSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    temperaturetemperatureSubject Category: Properties
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    was unknown and adsorption capacity is likely modified through weatheringweatheringSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    and adsorption of organic compoundsorganic compoundsSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    over time. Wildfire-produced charcoal displayed no trend with time since fire (TSF) (p>0.1) yet measured an average capacity of 29.70 (±6.23) µg phenol. mg charcoal-1 across all sites. Increased formation temperature of laboratory charcoal correlated with a higher adsorption affinity of simple phenol in solution. Thermogravimetric analysisanalysisSubject Category: Techniques, Methodologies and Equipment
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    (TGA) was used to provide information on the composition of samples and quantified as the percent of total mass released by pyrolysispyrolysisSubject Category: Techniques, Methodologies and Equipment
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    and combustioncombustionSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    using discrete regions of the thermal curve. The black carbon (BC) fraction, defined in this study as the mass combustible at 1000°C under O2 (gas), was positively correlated to temperature in laboratory charcoal (r2=0.82, p<0.01) and negatively correlated to TSF in field-collected charcoal despite plot effects (r2=0.68; p<0.01). While the BC fraction of laboratory charcoal increased with increasing temperature, field-collected charcoal was found to have a higher BC fraction at more recent fire sites and suggests wildfire temperatures <300°C or oxidative decomposition with TSF. The mass of lignocelluloselignocelluloseSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    and adsorbed organic compounds volatilized between 200°C-750°C decreased with temperature in laboratory charcoal (r2=0.91; p<0.001) and increased with TSF in field-collected charcoal (r2=0.72; p<0.01). Results from TGA suggest that charcoal collected along the chronosequence sites display the BC fraction linked to the hypothesized trend of decreased adsorption capacity with TSF, which the adsorption experiment did not confirm.

    ISSN : 0016-7061

    DOI : 10.1016/j.geoderma.2016.07.016

    Record Number : 20163308043

    Publisher : Elsevier Ltd

    Location of publication : Oxford

    Country of publication : UK

    Language of text : English

    Indexing terms for this abstract:

    Descriptor(s) : adsorptionadsorptionSubject Category: Natural Processes
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    , analysisanalysisSubject Category: Techniques, Methodologies and Equipment
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    , capacitycapacitySubject Category: Properties
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    , carboncarbonSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    , charcoalcharcoalSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    , chemical compositionchemical compositionSubject Category: Properties
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    , chronosequenceschronosequencesSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , combustioncombustionSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , compositioncompositionSubject Category: Properties
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    , cyclingcyclingSubject Category: Natural Processes
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    , decompositiondecompositionSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , firefireSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , firesfiresSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , forestsforestsSubject Category: Habitats
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    , formationformationSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , historyhistorySubject Category: Disciplines, Occupations and Industries
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    , lignocelluloselignocelluloseSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    , nutrientsnutrientsSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , organic carbonorganic carbonSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , organic compoundsorganic compoundsSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    , organic matterorganic matterSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , phenolphenolSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    , pyrolysispyrolysisSubject Category: Techniques, Methodologies and Equipment
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    , researchresearchSubject Category: Disciplines, Occupations and Industries
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    , soilsoilSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , soil chemistrysoil chemistrySubject Category: Disciplines, Occupations and Industries
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    , temperaturetemperatureSubject Category: Properties
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    , throughfallthroughfallSubject Category: Climate Related
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    , weatheringweatheringSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , wildfireswildfiresSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    Identifier(s) : nutrient cycling, organic chemicals, studies, United States of America

    Geographical Location(s) : Pacific Northwest States of USApacific northwest states of usaSubject Category: Geographic Entities
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    , USAusaSubject Category: Geographic Entities
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    Broader term(s) : Pacific States of USApacific states of usaSubject Category: Geographic Entities
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    , Western States of USAwestern states of usaSubject Category: Geographic Entities
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    , USAusaSubject Category: Geographic Entities
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    , APEC countriesapec countriesSubject Category: Institutions and Organisations
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    , Developed Countriesdeveloped countriesSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , North Americanorth americaSubject Category: Geographic Entities
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    , AmericaamericaSubject Category: Geographic Entities
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    , OECD Countriesoecd countriesSubject Category: Institutions and Organisations
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