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  • Early structural stability of fine dam sediment in soil construction.

    Author(s) : Fourvel, G.Vidal-Beaudet, L.Bocq, A. leBrochier, V.Théry, F.Landry, D.Kumarasamy, T.Cannavo, P.

    Author Affiliation : EDF (Electricité de France) R&D, Moret sur Loing, France.

    Author Email : patrice.cannavo@agrocampus-ouest.fr

    Journal article : Journal of Soils and Sediments 2018 Vol.18 No.7 pp.2647-2663 ref.72

    Abstract : Purpose: Fine sediments accumulate upstream of hydroelectric damsdamsSubject Category: Infrastructure
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    . To ensure that dams can operate properly, most sediments are returned downstream reaches, but a portion of them have to be dredged and land managed. In parallel, using topsoiltopsoilSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    from agricultural parcels for urban greeninggreeningSubject Category: Natural Processes
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    is currently controversial because arable surface areas are decreasing. An alternative idea for protecting these natural resourcesnatural resourcesSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    consists in reusing fine dredged sedimentsedimentSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    to construct functional soils. The agronomical use of fine dredged sediment raises the question of its ability to provide acceptable physical propertiesphysical propertiesSubject Category: Properties
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    for plant growth. Materials and methods: Six dredged sediments with contrasted initial agronomical properties were mixed or not with green waste compost and submitted or not to drying-wetting cycles in a 105-day-long experiment under greenhouse conditions. The sediments were analyzed for their capacitycapacitySubject Category: Properties
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    to generate stable aggregatesaggregatesSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    . We measured the proportion of macro aggregates >2 mm with dry-sieved aggregate (DSA) fraction and the >0.25 mm water-stable aggregate (WSA) fraction for each treatment over time. We also assessed the main sediment physicochemical propertiesphysicochemical propertiesSubject Category: Properties
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    , microbial biomassbiomassSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    carboncarbonSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    , and carbon mineralizationmineralizationSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    potential. Results and discussion: Compost addition (40% in volume) enhanced the WSA fraction of the low-organic-matter-content sediments (<30 g kg-1), whereas it had a non-significant effect in the other sediments. Multiple linear regressions highlighted a determining role of organic matterorganic matterSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    in the WSA fraction. At this scale of aggregation, organic matter seemed to mainly interact with clay in an acidic context. Compost addition had either no significant effect or a negative effect on the DSA fraction. Multiple linear regressions suggested that organic matter was not clearly involved in DSA formationformationSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    in the sediment, whereas macro-porosity was. The first drying-wetting cycles enhanced the DSA proportion of the sediments, but the following cycles had a negative effect. We suggest that disaggregating mechanisms gradually predominated over aggregating mechanisms over time. Conclusions: All sediments showed acceptable physicochemical properties for plant growth. WSA formation in low-organic-matter-content sediments was improved by adding compost. Drying-wetting cycles had a controversial effect on DSA formation, and only the very first cycles had a beneficial effect on macro-aggregation. The mechanisms involved in aggregation and aggregate stabilitystabilitySubject Category: Properties
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    in soilsoilSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    constructed from sediments seem to be similar to those involved in natural soils. That is why we propose that the soil hierarchical aggregation model initially developed for natural and cultivated soils could be adapted to sediments.

    ISSN : 1439-0108

    DOI : 10.1007/s11368-018-1926-2

    Record Number : 20183369750

    Publisher : Springer Berlin

    Location of publication : Heidelberg

    Country of publication : Germany

    Language of text : English

    Indexing terms for this abstract:

    Descriptor(s) : aggregatesaggregatesSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , agricultural soilsagricultural soilsSubject Category: Soil Types
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    , biomassbiomassSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , capacitycapacitySubject Category: Properties
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    , carboncarbonSubject Category: Chemicals and Chemical Groups
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    , compostscompostsSubject Category: Commodities and Products
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    , constructionconstructionSubject Category: Disciplines, Occupations and Industries
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    , damsdamsSubject Category: Infrastructure
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    , dredgingsdredgingsSubject Category: Commodities and Products
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    , drying wetting cyclesdrying wetting cyclesSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , formationformationSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , greeninggreeningSubject Category: Natural Processes
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    , microorganismsmicroorganismsSubject Category: Organism Groups
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    , mineralizationmineralizationSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , natural resourcesnatural resourcesSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , organic matterorganic matterSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , physical propertiesphysical propertiesSubject Category: Properties
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    , physicochemical propertiesphysicochemical propertiesSubject Category: Properties
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    , propertiespropertiesSubject Category: Properties
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    , sedimentsedimentSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , soilsoilSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , stabilitystabilitySubject Category: Properties
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    , topsoiltopsoilSubject Category: Miscellaneous
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    , wasteswastesSubject Category: Commodities and Products
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    Identifier(s) : micro-organisms, microbial biomass, plant growth, wetting drying cycles